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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Where Science Takes You

Kaitlin in a laboratory
When Washington State University doctoral student Kaitlin Witherell was a child, she frequently went to work with her scientist mother. Through her young eyes and vivid imagination, she watched her mother complete complex calculations that filled entire pages, make exotic and colorful solutions, and use alien-like equipment that seemed more magical than practical. » More ...

Understanding Immunity to Improve Health

Dr. Goodman and Marena Guzman in Dr. Goodman's laboratory
Just a few short hours after illness-causing bacteria enter the human body, a sophisticated defense system goes to work. The immune system quickly recognizes the foreign invaders and sends a well-orchestrated, frontline defense. “Innate immunity is ancient,” says Alan Goodman, assistant professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences and affiliate faculty in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. “Our bodies have many ways of fighting infectious disease, but innate immunity is something that must be important for it to have persisted.” » More ...

WSU’s One Health approach is a two‑for‑one stop for health care in Tanzania

A Maasai woman walking with four children and a dog.
Promoting healthcare strategies that target both human and animal populations at the same time can save money, participant time and result in a two-for-one stop for health care services. That’s according to a new study by scientists at Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. » More ...

WSU pilot study to address antibiotic resistance in children

In the lab looking at a sample.
Nearly 1,000 stool samples from halfway around the world may show how to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance in developing countries. Researchers at Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health will analyze the samples from Bangladesh for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic-resistant genes. » More ...

A Veterinary Couple’s Commitment to End Rabies

Rachel Clark standing in the middle of about 3 dozen children
John and Rachel Clark are driven to prevent rabies in Africa, a disease that kills tens of thousands of children worldwide each year. So driven, in fact, for the past two years they have packed up their now 4- and 8-year-old children to host canine rabies vaccination clinics in Malawi, East Africa, where John was born and raised. “I saw an article about Rabies Free Africa in the HuffPost featuring Dr. Guy Palmer,” says John. “I sent a note to Rachel that said, ‘This is what I want to do!’” » More ...

Working together so Kenyans can help Kenyans

Bryan Slinker in Marsabit Kenya with camels
When Paul Allen visited East Africa, he saw how people’s daily lives could be improved and the desire for local institutions to better serve people in need. His experience motivated his generosity, and today the reach of his namesake Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health and its service to people has expanded even more than its founders could have imagined. » More ...

Allen School Working with Local Hospitals to Study the Zika Virus

Image of Zika team, Mombasa City Hospital
Walking into a public hospital on the southern edge of Mombasa, Kenya, around eight o’clock in the morning, there were already 10–15 pregnant women, most with children in tow, sitting on benches outside the clinic waiting to be seen by a health care worker for prenatal care » More ...

WSU and Veterinary Clinics Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet

Standing in the Allen School lobby.
Every time a dog comes in for a rabies vaccination at the Lien Animal Clinic in West Seattle, Washington, the clinic donates $1 to the WSU Canine Rabies Vaccination Program to help end rabies around the globe. “Many people don’t know much about rabies because it is not a big problem in the United States,” says clinic co-owner and WSU alumna, Dr. Beth Fritzler (’91 DVM). “But it is a serious disease.” Each year an estimated 60,000 people die from rabies worldwide. Almost all deaths are in Africa and Asia. One-half of deaths are children under the age of 16. » More ...

Does Zika Virus Cause Birth Defects in Africa?

Eric Osoro and Hariet Mireiri in front of an informational sign on Zika
On a typical day, the maternal and child health unit at Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, will be bustling with dozens of pregnant women waiting to be attended by the doctor and find out how their babies were progressing. For the women, this is a reassuring monthly routine in a country with high numbers of maternal and infant deaths. Besides the maternal and neonatal deaths, a worry which occupies the pregnant women is the possibility of a baby born with birth defects. » More ...