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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

A Veterinary Couple’s Commitment to End Rabies

Rachel Clark standing in the middle of about 3 dozen children
John and Rachel Clark are driven to prevent rabies in Africa, a disease that kills tens of thousands of children worldwide each year. So driven, in fact, for the past two years they have packed up their now 4- and 8-year-old children to host canine rabies vaccination clinics in Malawi, East Africa, where John was born and raised. “I saw an article about Rabies Free Africa in the HuffPost featuring Dr. Guy Palmer,” says John. “I sent a note to Rachel that said, ‘This is what I want to do!’” » More ...

Supporting Equine Veterinary Students for 52 Years

Haley Primley standing near a fence outside the veterinary teaching hospital
In 1968, the very first Washington Thoroughbred Breeders and Owners Association Scholarship was awarded to veterinary student Arthur “Rocky” Crate (’69 DVM) in the amount of $200. He wrote, “I feel very proud, and very humble, to be so highly honored. No other scholarship would have given me the pleasure and the satisfaction that yours has given me, not only because of my love for horses, but because I hold your association, and the work which you are doing, in very high regard.” » More ...

Our Caring Profession Award

John Mattoon and his wife Jennifer sanding with the dean of the college.
Eight years ago, WSU faculty member and alumnus, Dr. John Mattoon and his wife Jennifer created the Our Caring Profession Award to recognize a veterinary student each year who most epitomizes the “gentle doctor.” Qualities like sincere compassion, caring for animals and people, excellence in mentoring and serving as a role model, expertise, humaneness, judgment, and understanding, are the things that make these recipients stand out. » More ...

Training our Students for Success

Dr. Goodman and Keesha in the lab looking at a slide
Keesha Matz wants to understand some of the world’s deadliest viruses. Raised in Chehalis, Washington, her love for microbiology began in a molecular genetics high school class taught by WSU alumnus Henri Weeks. “The class gave me a real feel for research, which I think is unique for a high school class,” says Matz. » More ...

Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens

Mike Konkel with graduate student Nicholas Negretti
In a light-filled laboratory, Nick Negretti grows bacteria. “I love pathogens,” says Negretti, who is a graduate student in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “They are so interesting. In each of us, there are more bacterial cells than human cells,” he says. “And while most bacteria are helpful, there are a few that make us sick.” » More ...

A Puppy Mill Dog’s New Chance

Holli, Linda, and Tandy kneeling with Leah the dog in the WSU veterinary teaching hospital intensive care
For three days, “Leah,” a charcoal gray Cane Corso, or Italian Mastiff, with a white patch on her chest had not been breathing on her own. Hooked up to a ventilator in the intensive care unit of the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, the machine delivered each breath to her weakened body. After so much time, her owner Holli Peters wasn’t sure Leah was going to pull through. “I thought about taking her off the ventilator, because her prognosis was not good,” she says. But on the fifth day, Leah started showing signs of improvement. She was starting to breathe on her own. » More ...

A WSU Small Animal Intern Gets Specialized Critical Care Training

Marie-Lou Gauthier
After earning a DVM from the University of Montreal, Marie-Lou Gauthier was thrilled to be accepted as an intern at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital to further her education and gain more hands-on experience. So she felt very fortunate when she and other WSU interns were given the opportunity to spend two weeks at Animal Critical Care and Emergency Services (ACCES) in Seattle. » More ...