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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Teaching science students visual literacy life skills

Erika Offerdahl and Jessie Arneson
Students who study molecular biosciences can’t actually see what they are learning. “We can never see with our eyes the things we study,” says Erika Offerdahl, a biochemist and associate professor in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “It is hard to directly see beyond the sub-cellular level, so as students we learn through representation.” » More ...

Training our Students for Success

Dr. Goodman and Keesha in the lab looking at a slide
Keesha Matz wants to understand some of the world’s deadliest viruses. Raised in Chehalis, Washington, her love for microbiology began in a molecular genetics high school class taught by WSU alumnus Henri Weeks. “The class gave me a real feel for research, which I think is unique for a high school class,” says Matz. » More ...

Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens

Mike Konkel with graduate student Nicholas Negretti
In a light-filled laboratory, Nick Negretti grows bacteria. “I love pathogens,” says Negretti, who is a graduate student in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “They are so interesting. In each of us, there are more bacterial cells than human cells,” he says. “And while most bacteria are helpful, there are a few that make us sick.” » More ...

Scholarship Helps Make Dreams a Reality

Floricel Gonzalez (’16 BS) was attending the School of Molecular Biosciences scholarship awards ceremony holding a letter in her hand. She knew she’d received a scholarship, but didn’t yet know which one. Carefully opening the letter, she read the name: The Elizabeth R. Hall Endowment Scholarship. “My jaw dropped,” says Gonzalez. The prestigious award, given to promising students in medical microbiology, was $4,000. “It was a breath of fresh air that I don’t have to worry about tuition or books for my last year.” » More ...

1st Biennial Chromatin-DNA Repair Lecture Honors Drs. Raymond Reeves and Michael Smerdon

Standing in a laboratory with a DNA model behind them
To honor Drs. Smerdon and Reeves and their long careers and innovative research on how DNA in chromatin influences basic cell functions, the School of Molecular Biosciences hosted the Smerdon/Reeves Symposium on DNA Repair in Chromatin: The First 40 years (and Beyond). » More ...

Awards and Achievements: Congratulations to Drs. Hunt and Ritter elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences

Congratulations to Drs. Patricia Hunt and Sue Ritter who were elected to the Washington State Academy of Sciences for their outstanding scientific records of achievement and willingness to work on behalf of the academy to bring the best available science to bear on issues within the state. » More ...

Reaching for the STARS

Travis Kent
When Travis Kent was still a high school student in Boise, Idaho, Washington State University was one of his top choices. But it was on a visit to the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences when he was told about STARS, a fast-track program where students can begin as undergraduates and earn a doctorate in seven years, when he knew this was the place for him. » More ...

WSU’s School of Molecular Biosciences Joins the College of Veterinary Medicine

Standing in the lab looking at a document with students in lab coats behind them..
For the past seven years Dr. Mike Konkel, professor in the School for Molecular Biosciences, and Dr. Doug Call, professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, have been working together to find answers about how to better control some of the most serious disease causing bacteria found in our food supply. “I believe the best work comes from collaboration,” said Dr. Konkel. “The key for us is we complement each other well. We have overlapping interests, but different expertise and are willing to be flexible and accommodate each other. That’s what makes a collaboration like ours last for so many years.” » More ...