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  • Kaitlin in a laboratory Where Science Takes You

    When Washington State University doctoral student Kaitlin Witherell was a child, she frequently went to work with her scientist mother. Through her young eyes and vivid imagination, she watched her mother complete complex calculations that filled entire pages, make exotic and colorful solutions, and use alien-like equipment that seemed more magical than practical.

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    Read Story Where Science Takes You
  • Dr. Goodman and Marena Guzman in Dr. Goodman's laboratory Understanding Immunity to Improve Health

    Just a few short hours after illness-causing bacteria enter the human body, a sophisticated defense system goes to work. The immune system quickly recognizes the foreign invaders and sends a well-orchestrated, frontline defense.

    “Innate immunity is ancient,” says Alan Goodman, assistant professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences and affiliate faculty in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. “Our bodies have many ways of fighting infectious disease, but innate immunity is something that must be important for it to have persisted.”

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    Read Story Understanding Immunity to Improve Health
  • A Maasai woman walking with four children and a dog. WSU’s One Health approach is a two‑for‑one stop for health care in Tanzania

    Promoting healthcare strategies that target both human and animal populations at the same time can save money, participant time and result in a two-for-one stop for health care services.

    That’s according to a new study by scientists at Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health.

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    Read Story WSU’s One Health approach is a two‑for‑one stop for health care in Tanzania
  • In the lab looking at a sample. WSU pilot study to address antibiotic resistance in children

    Nearly 1,000 stool samples from halfway around the world may show how to reduce the risk of antibiotic resistance in developing countries.

    Researchers at Washington State University’s Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health will analyze the samples from Bangladesh for antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic-resistant genes.

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    Read Story WSU pilot study to address antibiotic resistance in children
  • Rachel Clark standing in the middle of about 3 dozen children A Veterinary Couple’s Commitment to End Rabies

    John and Rachel Clark are driven to prevent rabies in Africa, a disease that kills tens of thousands of children worldwide each year. So driven, in fact, for the past two years they have packed up their now 4- and 8-year-old children to host canine rabies vaccination clinics in Malawi, East Africa, where John was born and raised.

    “I saw an article about Rabies Free Africa in the HuffPost featuring Dr. Guy Palmer,” says John. “I sent a note to Rachel that said, ‘This is what I want to do!’”

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    Read Story A Veterinary Couple’s Commitment to End Rabies
  • Bryan Slinker in Marsabit Kenya with camels Working together so Kenyans can help Kenyans

    When Paul Allen visited East Africa, he saw how people’s daily lives could be improved and the desire for local institutions to better serve people in need. His experience motivated his generosity, and today the reach of his namesake Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health and its service to people has expanded even more than its founders could have imagined.

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    Read Story Working together so Kenyans can help Kenyans
  • Image of Zika team, Mombasa City Hospital Allen School Working with Local Hospitals to Study the Zika Virus

    Walking into a public hospital on the southern edge of Mombasa, Kenya, around eight o’clock in the morning, there were already 10–15 pregnant women, most with children in tow, sitting on benches outside the clinic waiting to be seen by a health care worker for prenatal care

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    Read Story Allen School Working with Local Hospitals to Study the Zika Virus
  • Maasai man in Tanzania pouring milk from calabash gourd One World. One Health.

    When the places where people live have adequate sanitation and clean water, and the animals people raise for food are free from disease, people are not only healthier, but they also have improved life chances through higher income, better education, and overall well-being. That is One Health.

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    Read Story One World. One Health.
  • Standing in the Allen School lobby. WSU and Veterinary Clinics Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet

    Every time a dog comes in for a rabies vaccination at the Lien Animal Clinic in West Seattle, Washington, the clinic donates $1 to the WSU Canine Rabies Vaccination Program to help end rabies around the globe.

    “Many people don’t know much about rabies because it is not a big problem in the United States,” says clinic co-owner and WSU alumna, Dr. Beth Fritzler (’91 DVM). “But it is a serious disease.” Each year an estimated 60,000 people die from rabies worldwide. Almost all deaths are in Africa and Asia. One-half of deaths are children under the age of 16.

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    Read Story WSU and Veterinary Clinics Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet
  • Eric Osoro and Hariet Mireiri in front of an informational sign on Zika Does Zika Virus Cause Birth Defects in Africa?

    On a typical day, the maternal and child health unit at Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, will be bustling with dozens of pregnant women waiting to be attended by the doctor and find out how their babies were progressing. For the women, this is a reassuring monthly routine in a country with high numbers of maternal and infant deaths. Besides the maternal and neonatal deaths, a worry which occupies the pregnant women is the possibility of a baby born with birth defects.

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    Read Story Does Zika Virus Cause Birth Defects in Africa?
  • Dr. Adair is looking through a microscope 5 Questions with School of Molecular Biosciences alumna Jennifer Adair

    Jennifer Adair (’05 PhD, School of Molecular Biosciences) had never heard of Pullman when she considered WSU’s National Institute of Health Protein Biotechnology Training Program. She even shamefully admits, at first, she confused WSU with the University of Washington. Now, the Coug is developing gene therapies to treat genetic disorders, HIV and cancer. Adair is a faculty member in the Clinical Research Division at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle. Her goal: provide safe, cost-effective applications for gene therapy that can be implemented worldwide.

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    Read Story 5 Questions with School of Molecular Biosciences alumna Jennifer Adair
  • Dr. Goodman and Marena Guzman in Dr. Goodman's laboratory Understanding Immunity to Improve Health

    Just a few short hours after illness-causing bacteria enter the human body, a sophisticated defense system goes to work. The immune system quickly recognizes the foreign invaders and sends a well-orchestrated, frontline defense.

    “Innate immunity is ancient,” says Alan Goodman, assistant professor in the School of Molecular Biosciences and affiliate faculty in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. “Our bodies have many ways of fighting infectious disease, but innate immunity is something that must be important for it to have persisted.”

    Read Story
    Read Story Understanding Immunity to Improve Health
  • A group of plastice bottles Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated

    Researchers have developed a more accurate method of measuring bisphenol A (BPA) levels in humans and found that exposure to the endocrine-disrupting chemical is far higher than previously assumed.

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    Read Story Study finds BPA levels in humans dramatically underestimated
  • Pierce sitting on the steps next to a statue outside the clinic From WSU to the Mayo Clinic: My Summer as an Undergraduate Research Fellow

    Walking quickly through an underground tunnel that stretches nearly a half mile, I carried samples frozen on dry ice between two buildings on the Mayo Clinic campus to be tested as part of a clinical study on irritable bowel syndrome, or IBS. Analysis of the tissues may help physician-scientists understand the causes of IBS and one day find a cure. In other places, it could take hours or days for analysis to begin, but here at the Mayo Clinic, I was impressed by how almost instantaneous everything is.

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    Read Story From WSU to the Mayo Clinic: My Summer as an Undergraduate Research Fellow
  • Erika Offerdahl and Jessie Arneson Teaching science students visual literacy life skills

    Students who study molecular biosciences can’t actually see what they are learning.

    “We can never see with our eyes the things we study,” says Erika Offerdahl, a biochemist and associate professor in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “It is hard to directly see beyond the sub-cellular level, so as students we learn through representation.”

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    Read Story Teaching science students visual literacy life skills
  • A large, ceremonial check is presented to WSU during a Cougar football game. $2.2 million gift creates School of Molecular Biosciences graduate fellowships

    A $2.2 million gift from the estate of Bernadine and James Seabrandt will create the Bernadine Fulfs Seabrandt Graduate Fellowship in Molecular Biosciences at Washington State University’s School of Molecular Biosciences.

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    Read Story $2.2 million gift creates School of Molecular Biosciences graduate fellowships
  • Standing in front of the Office of the Campus Veteriarian sign. Five Questions with Dr. Gay Lynn Clyde

    From as long as I can remember, I have loved animals. Growing up, my family lived mostly in the suburbs. We had a dog, but I would not have considered them “animal” people. When I was 9 years old, I started riding horses. I bought my first horse when I was 12 years old from money I’d saved mowing lawns in the summer. I knew then that I would be a veterinarian.

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    Read Story Five Questions with Dr. Gay Lynn Clyde
  • Mike Konkel with graduate student Nicholas Negretti Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens

    In a light-filled laboratory, Nick Negretti grows bacteria. “I love pathogens,” says Negretti, who is a graduate student in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “They are so interesting. In each of us, there are more bacterial cells than human cells,” he says. “And while most bacteria are helpful, there are a few that make us sick.”

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    Read Story Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens
  • Scholarship Helps Make Dreams a Reality

    Floricel Gonzalez (’16 BS) was attending the School of Molecular Biosciences scholarship awards ceremony holding a letter in her hand. She knew she’d received a scholarship, but didn’t yet know which one. Carefully opening the letter, she read the name: The Elizabeth R. Hall Endowment Scholarship. “My jaw dropped,” says Gonzalez. The prestigious award, given to promising students in medical microbiology, was $4,000. “It was a breath of fresh air that I don’t have to worry about tuition or books for my last year.”

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    Read Story Scholarship Helps Make Dreams a Reality
  • Standing in a laboratory with a DNA model behind them 1st Biennial Chromatin-DNA Repair Lecture Honors Drs. Raymond Reeves and Michael Smerdon

    To honor Drs. Smerdon and Reeves and their long careers and innovative research on how DNA in chromatin influences basic cell functions, the School of Molecular Biosciences hosted the Smerdon/Reeves Symposium on DNA Repair in Chromatin: The First 40 years (and Beyond).

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    Read Story 1st Biennial Chromatin-DNA Repair Lecture Honors Drs. Raymond Reeves and Michael Smerdon