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  • Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health

    Sitting around a campfire in Ndutu in northern Tanzania while enjoying a cold beverage was, perhaps, an unlikely “think tank” location. Having spent the day with our rabies vaccination team in the Serengeti District, Bryan Slinker, dean of the WSU College of Veterinary Medicine, WSU alumnus and veterinarian Dr. Kyle Frandle, Dr. Kathy Richmond of the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, and I brainstormed about how to get the needed grassroots involvement by people in developed countries to make rabies elimination a reality. The primary challenge is that rabies is truly a neglected disease and its burden in Africa and Asia is largely unrecognized in … » More …

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    Read Story Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health
  • Together WSU and Veterinary Clinics across the Country Are Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet

    Story by Marcia Hill Gossard, ’99, ’04 Ph.D. | Photo by Henry Moore Jr.

    Every time a dog comes in for a rabies vaccination at the Lien Animal Clinic in West Seattle, Washington, the clinic donates $1 to the WSU Canine Rabies Vaccination Program to help end rabies around the globe.

    “Many people don’t know much about rabies because it is not a big problem in the United States,” says clinic co-owner and WSU alumna, Dr. Beth Fritzler (’91 DVM). “But it is a serious disease.” Each year an estimated 60,000 people die from rabies worldwide. Almost all deaths are in Africa and Asia. One-half … » More …

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    Read Story Together WSU and Veterinary Clinics across the Country Are Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet
  • Does Zika Virus Cause Birth Defects in Africa?

    by Eric Osoro, a physician and medical epidemiologist with the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. Dr. Osoro serves as the Deputy Director of Public Health for WSU Global Health-Kenya. This column is a personal account of his research in Kenya on the Zika virus.

    On a typical day, the maternal and child health unit at Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, will be bustling with dozens of pregnant women waiting to be attended by the doctor and find out how their babies were progressing. For the women, this is a reassuring monthly routine in a country with high numbers of maternal and infant … » More …

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  • Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health

    Our encompassing goal is to improve public health and catalyze human opportunity through research, teaching, and outreach. To achieve this goal, it requires committed individuals. In October, we celebrated professor Kariuki Njenga who was elected to the National Academy of Medicine. It is described as “one of the highest honors in the fields of health and medicine and recognizes individuals who have demonstrated outstanding professional achievement and commitment to service.” Read more at go.wsu.edu/Njenga. This richly deserved recognition adds to the national and international reputation of the Allen School faculty. All of WSU’s National Academy of Medicine members are Allen School faculty, six are … » More …

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    Read Story Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health
  • Celebrating 10 Years: A Big Thanks to You

    “I’ve been proud to support the School for Global Animal Health because your work saves lives—in Africa and throughout the developing world. I’m happy to see that your efforts over the past decade have earned the school recognition as the preeminent institution of its kind. This gives you an even greater opportunity over the coming decade to substantially improve the quality of life for the families, communities, and nations in need of your expertise.”
    —Paul G. Allen on the 10th anniversary of the founding of the school

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  • Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health

    The Allen School, and the broader global health programs at WSU, would not exist today without the support of Paul G. Allen and the over 300 individual donors who continue to invest in our mission. This support catalyzed the University’s subsequent investment in the Allen School and has dramatically changed the global health landscape at WSU. Over the past four years, our federal research support, principally from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has increased more than 300 percent, demonstrating the multiplier effect of initial philanthropic support. Perhaps more impactful than this catalytic effect, donor support drives innovation … » More …

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    Read Story Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health
  • Faculty News Summer 2017

    photo of douglas in the field

    Douglas Call, professor in the Allen School, received the Sahlin Faculty Excellence Award for Research, Scholarship, and Arts. His research has led to greater understanding about the ways bacteria develop resistance to antibiotics. In east Africa, where people, domestic livestock, and wildlife live close together, Dr. Call is leading a multidisciplinary team to understand how antibiotic resistance arises and spreads through communities.

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    Read Story Faculty News Summer 2017
  • Why Keep Chickens? A Chat with Tanzanian Farmers

    Notes from the Field

    by Zoë Campbell, a doctoral student in the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health. This column is Campbell’s personal account giving a first-hand glimpse of her research in Tanzania to improve the lives of animals and people.

    A Tanzanian village is not complete without chickens. Hens scratching in the dirt for insects, dusty chicks pushing their tiny bodies through tall grass to follow their mother, roosters delightedly crowing at all hours. They are the most common form of livestock, kept by 48 percent of rural households. As a graduate student working under the Program for Enhancing Health and Productivity … » More …

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  • Student and Fellow News Summer 2017

    Photo of Keesha Matz

    Keesha Matz, an undergraduate microbiology major in the WSU Honors College mentored by Hector Aguilar-Carreño and Troy Bankhead in the Allen School, is one of only 240 students nationwide to receive the Barry M. Goldwater Scholarships for 2017–18.

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    Read Story Student and Fellow News Summer 2017
  • Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health Summer 2017

    “Build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to your door.” Ralph Waldo Emerson’s famous aphorism may apply to mousetraps, but certainly not to all inventions, even those with potential to markedly improve lives and livelihoods. To the contrary, one of the great challenges in global health and development is to understand what determines whether a technology—such as a new vaccine, water collection system, or improved crop variety—is adopted and used. While the Allen School is heavily engaged in the discovery and development of new disease prevention and treatment tools, we are also mindful that these advances are only impactful if they … » More …

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    Read Story Message from the WSU Senior Director of Global Health Summer 2017
  • Five Questions with Dr. Gay Lynn Clyde

    Can you tell us a little about yourself?

    From as long as I can remember, I have loved animals. Growing up, my family lived mostly in the suburbs. We had a dog, but I would not have considered them “animal” people. When I was 9 years old, I started riding horses. I bought my first horse when I was 12 years old from money I’d saved mowing lawns in the summer. I knew then that I would be a veterinarian.

    After I earned a bachelor of science degree in microbiology from Washington State University, I applied to several veterinary schools. Applying to veterinary school was, … » More …

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    Read Story Five Questions with Dr. Gay Lynn Clyde
  • Message From the Director

    Recently, I received three letters from 4th graders at Walnut Grove Elementary School in Vancouver, Washington. They wrote that they are avid sport fans, and each stated their interest in WSU. Their enthusiasm is infectious, and I am hoping that they will one day take some classes in our school and even become School of Molecular Biosciences majors. Maybe they can follow in the footsteps of our featured alumna, Dr. Gay Lynn Clyde. She earned a degree in microbiology and also received her doctorate in veterinary medicine from WSU. Dr. Clyde is a great role model not only for our current crop of undergraduates, but … » More …

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  • Training our Students for Success

    Story by Marcia Hill Gossard ’99, ’04 | Photo by Henry Moore Jr.

    Keesha Matz wants to understand some of the world’s deadliest viruses. Raised in Chehalis, Washington, her love for microbiology began in a molecular genetics high school class taught by WSU alumnus Henri Weeks.

    “The class gave me a real feel for research, which I think is unique for a high school class,” says Matz.

    That experience inspired her to apply to the WSU School of Molecular Bioscience’s STARS program. Students Targeted toward Advanced Research Studies, or STARS, accelerates learning and provides hands-on research experience. “They help you get into a research lab … » More …

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  • Message from the Director

    I am writing this letter the week following our May graduation ceremonies. The sun is shining and all is well with the world! Congratulations once again to all our graduating seniors and doctoral students. During the ceremony, one of our faculty, Jon Oatley, hooded SMB graduate student Aileen Helsel who earned her doctorate after researching sperm stem cell biology in Jon’s lab. It has been a busy few months for Aileen. In the last two months, Aileen not only defended her thesis and published a research paper, but also gave birth to a baby girl. That’s what I call productivity! Aileen’s growing family reminds me … » More …

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  • Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens

    by Marcia Hill Gossard ’99, ‘04

    dsc_9133

    In a light-filled laboratory, Nick Negretti grows bacteria.

    “I love pathogens,” says Negretti, who is a graduate student in the WSU School of Molecular Biosciences. “They are so interesting. In each of us, there are more bacterial cells than human cells,” he says. “And while most bacteria are helpful, there are a few that make us sick.”

    Negretti works in the lab of WSU professor Mike Konkel, a leading expert on the food-borne pathogen Campylobacter … » More …

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    Read Story Fellowship Helps Fund a Love of Pathogens
  • Fall/Winter 2016-17 – Message from the Director

    Nick Negretti’s comments in the accompanying news item remind me of why my job is such a pleasure. Nick’s enthusiasm for his work and his excitement about his project studying how Campylobacter jejuni manipulates its host cells to cause disease in humans is undeniable. It is also a credit to his project supervisor, Dr. Konkel. It should be apparent that Nick and our other SMB students are the driving force of our research enterprise. Supporting their efforts by providing research funds and stipends will ensure that these young eager students can translate basic science into cures of disease.

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    Read Story Fall/Winter 2016-17 – Message from the Director
  • More News

    News and Announcements

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  • Join us in Congratulating Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Genetics and Cell Biology Graduates!

    153041-SMB-newsletter-infographicAt spring commencement, we had the pleasure of congratulating 38 graduates from our three majors: microbiology, biochemistry, and genetics and cell biology. It was one of our largest graduating classes. We have witnessed tremendous growth and now have roughly 450 students, nearly doubling in size since 2012. The accomplishments of these and previous graduates speak to the strong programs we offer. Over the past five years, six of the 10 National Goldwater Scholarship recipients at WSU were majors in the School of Molecular Biosciences. Our students are also accepted annually into top tier graduate programs and professional schools in the health sciences.

    <img class="size-medium wp-image-394 alignright" src="https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/543/2016/06/DSC_9803-396x264.jpg" alt="DSC_9803" width="396" height="264" srcset="https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/543/2016/06/DSC_9803-396x264.jpg 396w, https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/543/2016/06/DSC_9803-768x511.jpg 768w, https://s3.wp.wsu.edu/uploads/sites/543/2016/06/DSC_9803-792x527.jpg ... » More …

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    Read Story Join us in Congratulating Biochemistry, Microbiology, and Genetics and Cell Biology Graduates!
  • Message from the Director

    Congratulations to all our graduates! Since coming to Pullman in 2013, I have been impressed with the undergraduate program and our exceptional students. Don’t take my word for it, please come visit us to see for yourself.

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  • Student News

    Kudos to sophomore Seth M. Schneider who won the annual Barry M. Goldwater scholarship. The merit-based awards go to college sophomores and juniors in science, engineering, and mathematics who intend to pursue a career in research. Sophomore Angela R. Rocchi received honorable mention. Schneider has worked in WSU microbiologist Cynthia Haseltine’s lab and is currently working with genomicist Kelly Brayton. Rocchi has worked in WSU bio- chemist Joseph Harding’s lab.

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    Distinguished Scholarships
    WSU News

    Congratulations to 2015 Wiley Expo winner Natalie Peer (right) with her mentor Dr. Kwanhee Kim. Natalie was the second place winner in … » More …

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