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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Coming Together: 650 Masks and Counting

Wearing donated cloth masks
In their Oregon home, Liz and Frank Wallace have a well-orchestrated production line for making cloth masks. Frank draws around the template and cuts out the fabric. Liz does the sewing. Then Frank pulls out the pins and strings the elastic. “We are a production team,” says Liz. They started making masks for the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital after learning the hospital’s staff needed them to stay healthy while treating animal patients. » More ...

They call her Lucy Sunshine

Portrait of Tami and Lucy. Lucy is wearing a Cancer Survivor scarf.
When Tami first found out Lucy had nasal cancer, she said she couldn’t even think about it.  But the doctors told her even though it is bad news, it is not the worst news because they could still treat her.  They told her that Lucy has a lot of happy days ahead of her with treatment. » More ...

WSU study aims to prevent adverse drug reactions in dogs

If not identified before surgery, a rare genetic mutation could result in your dog being exposed to dangerously high levels of anesthetic agents. Scientists at Washington State University’s College of Veterinary Medicine initially discovered the mutation in greyhounds and more recently in other common dog breeds. » More ...

Cancer Care Gives New Hope

Portrait of team in the WSU veterinary teaching hospital lobby
In the spring of 2019, Karen Kernaghan noticed that her dog’s nose was bleeding. “That was the start of it,” says Karen. She took “Kiki Blu,” a 6-year-old border collie mix, to her local veterinarian Dr. Jefferson Manens of Vancouver, British Columbia. He put Kiki under anesthesia and took a biopsy of tissue in her nose. The results came back benign. Dr. Manens still suspected something was wrong, so he phoned WSU veterinary oncologist Dr. Janean Fidel. Based on his description, Dr. Fidel agreed. He took another biopsy, this time with a special needle. Kiki had cancer. » More ...

Eight Lives for Thomas the Wonder Cat

Thomas the cat sitting on a scale
As we walk into the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, I can hear my cat’s meows getting louder and a lot longer. The last one seemed to have lasted 20 seconds. I start to wonder how any cat can possibly meow that long without taking a breath. “It’s okay, we’re going inside now,” I say in a futile effort to calm Thomas, our domestic short hair gray tabby. He has been meowing almost nonstop ever since we left the house. » More ...

A painted horse helps students learn anatomy

Veterinary student examining a live horse with painted horse in the background.
A life-sized painted fiberglass horse will now help WSU undergraduate and veterinary students learn anatomy thanks to a generous donor. “Understanding where organs are located relative to each other can be challenging for learners to grasp,” says Cynthia Faux, clinical assistant professor in the WSU Department of Integrated Physiology and Neuroscience. “Having a life-sized model to compare to a live horse can help them develop this necessary clinical skill and put organ relationships in perspective.” » More ...