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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Eight Lives for Thomas the Wonder Cat

Thomas the cat sitting on a scale
As we walk into the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, I can hear my cat’s meows getting louder and a lot longer. The last one seemed to have lasted 20 seconds. I start to wonder how any cat can possibly meow that long without taking a breath. “It’s okay, we’re going inside now,” I say in a futile effort to calm Thomas, our domestic short hair gray tabby. He has been meowing almost nonstop ever since we left the house. » More ...

A painted horse helps students learn anatomy

Veterinary student examining a live horse with painted horse in the background.
A life-sized painted fiberglass horse will now help WSU undergraduate and veterinary students learn anatomy thanks to a generous donor. “Understanding where organs are located relative to each other can be challenging for learners to grasp,” says Cynthia Faux, clinical assistant professor in the WSU Department of Integrated Physiology and Neuroscience. “Having a life-sized model to compare to a live horse can help them develop this necessary clinical skill and put organ relationships in perspective.” » More ...

Our Caring Profession Award

John Mattoon and his wife Jennifer sanding with the dean of the college.
Eight years ago, WSU faculty member and alumnus, Dr. John Mattoon and his wife Jennifer created the Our Caring Profession Award to recognize a veterinary student each year who most epitomizes the “gentle doctor.” Qualities like sincere compassion, caring for animals and people, excellence in mentoring and serving as a role model, expertise, humaneness, judgment, and understanding, are the things that make these recipients stand out. » More ...

A Puppy Mill Dog’s New Chance

Holli, Linda, and Tandy kneeling with Leah the dog in the WSU veterinary teaching hospital intensive care
For three days, “Leah,” a charcoal gray Cane Corso, or Italian Mastiff, with a white patch on her chest had not been breathing on her own. Hooked up to a ventilator in the intensive care unit of the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, the machine delivered each breath to her weakened body. After so much time, her owner Holli Peters wasn’t sure Leah was going to pull through. “I thought about taking her off the ventilator, because her prognosis was not good,” she says. But on the fifth day, Leah started showing signs of improvement. She was starting to breathe on her own. » More ...

Melle: The true story of a miraculous rescue, a helping hand, an extraordinary surgery, and the love for one dog

A few days after the New Year in 2014, Laurie Boukas of Richland, Washington, was walking her two Border Collies, Lucy and Connor, when she saw a Pontiac Trans Am drive by. Laurie, who had just moved to Richland a few weeks before with her husband, Nick, saw the car turn around and drive by again. » More ...