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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

How Virtual Reality is Changing Veterinary Medicine

Drs. Fransson and Watkins looking at a screen.
In a small, windowless room, four veterinarians simultaneously tie sutures, biopsy a liver, and perform minimally invasive abdominal surgery. No, this is not a typical operating room. It is a veterinary laparoscopic training laboratory—the first of its kind in the nation. » More ...

A Big Screen, High Definition Television Monitor Allows Trainees to Watch and Learn

Drs. Fransson and Watkins looking at a screen.
In a small, windowless room, four veterinarians simultaneously tie sutures, biopsy a liver, and perform minimally invasive abdominal surgery. No, this is not a typical operating room. It is a veterinary laparoscopic training laboratory—the first of its kind in the nation. But earlier this year before the WSU Veterinary Applied Laparoscopic Training, or VALT, laboratory got its new virtual laparoscopic trainer, the only place to watch the virtual procedures was on a small laptop computer monitor. » More ...

A Neurological Diagnostics Machine Helps to Detect Disease and Deafness

Dr. Chen using the electrodiagnostics machine on a dog patient
The WSU neurology service's new Electrodiagnostics machine will help make advanced muscle and nerve disorder diagnoses thanks to a generous friend of the college. Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) are two of the medical tests veterinarians will be able to perform with the new equipment. » More ...

Cancer Treatment Saves Police Service Dog

In early 2007, Corporal Tim Baulkham of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or RCMP, knew something wasn't right with his partner. Police Service Dog "Jack," a black lab and 7-year veteran on the force, had been losing weight and fur, and was not his usual energetic self. After a visit to a local veterinarian, Jack was referred to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. An MRI revealed what appeared to be a very large pituitary tumor. » More ...

A Large Screen TV Monitor Makes Teaching and Learning Easier

Students looking at the monitor.
Students can now watch ultrasounds, radiographs (or x-rays), and other procedures more easily thanks to a new large screen TV monitor from a generous friend of the college. Before the WSU cardiology group received the monitor, veterinary students crowded around a small computer screen or viewing window. Now students can view procedures more easily and more students can watch procedures at the same time. Students will also be able to watch medical procedures, such as fluoroscopy, in real time. » More ...

A New Gamma Camera Makes Lameness Diagnoses Easier Thanks to a Generous Gift to the College of Veterinary Medicine

The exact cause of lameness in horses can sometimes be difficult to find. But thanks to a generous donor, the WSU College of Veterinary Medicine's new gamma camera will make diagnosis easier. "The gamma camera is essential for equine orthopedic lameness," says Dr. Kelly Farnsworth assistant professor in WSU's Veterinary Clinical Sciences department. "Localized lameness is difficult to radiograph." » More ...

A New Ultrasound Machine Provides Pain Relief and Speeds Healing for Small Animals

Dogs and cats receiving physical therapy at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital will get some additional relief thanks to a new ultrasound machine from a generous friend of the college. The state-of-the-art ultrasound machine is the first for the small animal rehabilitation center, which began treating patients in January 2008. As of October the same year, the rehabilitation center treated more than 50 patients. » More ...

An Underwater Therapeutic Treadmill Helps a Dog Learn to Walk Again Thanks to Two Generous Friends of the College of Veterinary Medicine

After running for months with two broken legs, “Chocolate,” a stray Chesapeake Bay retriever, was brought to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital from a clinic in the Kennewick, Washington.  WSU veterinary orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Steve Martinez, performed several surgeries to help Chocolate regain the use of his injured front legs.  When the bandages came off, Chocolate began physical therapy in a special, underwater treadmill that allows animals to use their limbs without bearing full weight.  The treadmill, a gift to the college from two generous donors, makes it possible to begin the rehabilitation process earlier, which speeds recovery. » More ...