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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

WSU and Veterinary Clinics Working to End One of the Deadliest Diseases on the Planet

Standing in the Allen School lobby.
Every time a dog comes in for a rabies vaccination at the Lien Animal Clinic in West Seattle, Washington, the clinic donates $1 to the WSU Canine Rabies Vaccination Program to help end rabies around the globe. “Many people don’t know much about rabies because it is not a big problem in the United States,” says clinic co-owner and WSU alumna, Dr. Beth Fritzler (’91 DVM). “But it is a serious disease.” Each year an estimated 60,000 people die from rabies worldwide. Almost all deaths are in Africa and Asia. One-half of deaths are children under the age of 16. » More ...

Does Zika Virus Cause Birth Defects in Africa?

Eric Osoro and Hariet Mireiri in front of an informational sign on Zika
On a typical day, the maternal and child health unit at Coast General Hospital in Mombasa, Kenya, will be bustling with dozens of pregnant women waiting to be attended by the doctor and find out how their babies were progressing. For the women, this is a reassuring monthly routine in a country with high numbers of maternal and infant deaths. Besides the maternal and neonatal deaths, a worry which occupies the pregnant women is the possibility of a baby born with birth defects. » More ...

Allen School Celebrating 10 Years

Graphic of world with photos from Africa
Because of the generous support of Paul G. Allen and our hundreds of other private donors, the Allen School’s work has reached places as far away as Tanzania and Guatemala, and as close as right here in our very own Washington state. Over the last 10 years, we have become a preeminent global health program nationally and internationally. We continue to work directly with communities on three continents to improve the health of animals and people all over the world. We want to share with you just a few examples of our impact through innovative research and local programs. Impact that you help make possible. » More ...

Why Keep Chickens? A Chat with Tanzanian Farmers

Zoë Campbell talking to research team
A Tanzanian village is not complete without chickens. Hens scratching in the dirt for insects, dusty chicks pushing their tiny bodies through tall grass to follow their mother, roosters delightedly crowing at all hours. They are the most common form of livestock, kept by 48 percent of rural households. » More ...

Using Household Surveys to Understand Disease Control

Ashley Railey with survey team
Habari za asubuhi dada (good morning sister)! It is a little before 7:00 in the morning and the survey team slowly starts appearing at my residence ready to start another day in the field. The driver helps me load the charged computers, extra batteries, backup paper surveys, the paper visual aids, GPS devices, and peanut butter and jelly bag lunches into the car. Today we have a two-hour drive to the border of Tanzania and Kenya where we will ask 25 households to complete surveys. » More ...

A WSU Veterinary Alumna Helps a Student Travel to Tanzania

Veterinary student Cassie Eakins with Tanzanian children
As they entered a village in Tanzania, Cassie Eakins (’16 DVM) and members of the rabies team announced over a loudspeaker that there would be a rabies vaccine clinic coming to town the next day. At another village, they tossed posters from their vehicle. Once the team started to drive away, the village children gathered them up to be posted. The next day a crowd was lined up to have their dogs vaccinated. » More ...

Meet the Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health’s New Director

Closeup of Tom Kawula, director Paul G. Allen School for Global Animal Health
For the past 34 years when anyone asked me this question all I had to do was say that I was born and raised in Idaho, and it was enough to launch an entire dinner conversation. I’ve enjoyed describing to people what it was like to grow up in the west, and the fact that Idaho borders Washington and Canada, not Illinois. » More ...