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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

After Cancer Treatement Therapy Dog Has Two More Wonderful Years

"Mia," a bassador (Basset/Labrador mix) and therapy dog, was diagnosed with lymphoma in February 2012, just five months before her 10th birthday. She received several rounds of chemotherapy at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital and is currently in remission. In July, Mia with her canine family members celebrated her birthday by feasting on meat and cream cheese cupcakes. » More ...

WSU’s Veterinary Patient Wellness Service

Black lab with yellow vest in the treadmill with Lori Lutskas
Who says cookies can’t be good for you? When Lori Lutskas goes to work each day, she carries a bag of cookies with her to encourage her patients to do their exercises. “We do cookie stretches,” said Lutskas, a licensed veterinary technician and WSU’s veterinary physical rehabilitation practitioner. She puts a cookie (aka a healthy dog treat) on a dog’s hip so the dog will stretch around to get it. “We try to make it fun.” » More ...

Bald Eagle Released After Treatment for Lead Poisoning

Bald eagle coming out of the box
A five-year-old bald eagle was brought to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital in January after he was found in a ditch near Orofino, Idaho. After determining that the eagle showed signs of severe lead poisoning, Dr. Nickol Finch, head of the exotic and wildlife unit, gave him intravenous fluids and chelation therapy, which binds the lead so it can be eliminated through the kidneys. » More ...

WSU Oncology Resident Awarded Research Fund Will Pilot Study between WSU and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle

While working in a private clinic in Melbourne, Australia, Canadian-born veterinarian Dr. Kevin Choy of Vancouver, British Columbia, saw a lot of elderly patients and he noticed something. Although veterinary medicine was capable of managing many chronic illnesses, cancer was not one of them. » More ...

Rehabilitation Helps Dexter Walk Again

Dexter is a white and brown dachshund.
A 6-year-old dachshund name “Dexter,” was referred to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital by his local veterinarian after he stopped using his hind legs and began dragging them as he walked with his front legs. Dexter was having back pain and an MRI revealed one of his discs was pressing on his spinal cord causing the paralysis in his hind legs, a fairly common condition in dachshunds. » More ...

Grateful Clients: Dave and Eddylee Scott have Helped Raise over $20,000

Some friends throw the best parties. For two years in a row, our friends Dave and Eddylee Scott of Anacortes, Wash. threw a fabulous party to raise money for the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. They hosted the first event in 2010, which raised nearly $7,000 to honor their dog "Cassie" and the veterinarians who cared for her when she was diagnosed with cancer. » More ...

Barb and Joe Mendelson’s Life-Saving Gift

Some people really are larger than life.  Joe and Barb Mendelson are two such people. When they wanted to give to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital, they asked what would do the most good.  When they were told that the hospital desperately needed a new CT scanner, they didn't hesitate. » More ...

The First Ed McLeary Distinguished Professorship Awarded to Clinical Associate Professor in Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology

Dr. Kevin Snekvik, clinical associate professor in the Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology department, has been named the first Ed McLeary Distinguished Professor in Aquatic Health. The Ed McLeary Distinguished Professorship enhances WSU programs in fish health research, diagnostics, certification, and graduate education. Dr Snekvik, DVM, Ph.D is a diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Pathologists and the Aquatic Animal Health section head for the Washington Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory. » More ...

Good Samaritan Funds Give a Rescued Puppy Mill Dog named Dancer a Chance at a New Life

"Dancer," a 7-year-old Powder-puff Chinese Crested, wasn't always as healthy and happy as she is today. She spent the first 6 years of her life in a puppy mill in Oregon. When she came to live with Tracy and her family in Idaho, all her toes were dislocated from being confined to a wire cage. Her teeth had rotted, she had a cyst, and an injured back. "She was in such bad shape, we really debated if the journey to get well was worth the pain she would go through," said Tracy. » More ...