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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Cancer Treatment Saves Police Service Dog

In early 2007, Corporal Tim Baulkham of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, or RCMP, knew something wasn't right with his partner. Police Service Dog "Jack," a black lab and 7-year veteran on the force, had been losing weight and fur, and was not his usual energetic self. After a visit to a local veterinarian, Jack was referred to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. An MRI revealed what appeared to be a very large pituitary tumor. » More ...

A Large Screen TV Monitor Makes Teaching and Learning Easier

Students looking at the monitor.
Students can now watch ultrasounds, radiographs (or x-rays), and other procedures more easily thanks to a new large screen TV monitor from a generous friend of the college. Before the WSU cardiology group received the monitor, veterinary students crowded around a small computer screen or viewing window. Now students can view procedures more easily and more students can watch procedures at the same time. Students will also be able to watch medical procedures, such as fluoroscopy, in real time. » More ...

A New Portable Echocardiograph Makes Heart Diagnosis Possible in Remote Locations

Patients at WSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital can now receive on-location cardiovascular diagnosis thanks to a new portable echocardiograph from a generous friend of the college. "We are very grateful to have this machine." said Dr. Lynne Nelson, a WSU veterinary cardiologist. "This echo is the latest, state-of-the-art, portable machine. Because it is portable, we can take it to a sick horse, kitten, or any animal." » More ...

A New Gamma Camera Makes Lameness Diagnoses Easier Thanks to a Generous Gift to the College of Veterinary Medicine

The exact cause of lameness in horses can sometimes be difficult to find. But thanks to a generous donor, the WSU College of Veterinary Medicine's new gamma camera will make diagnosis easier. "The gamma camera is essential for equine orthopedic lameness," says Dr. Kelly Farnsworth assistant professor in WSU's Veterinary Clinical Sciences department. "Localized lameness is difficult to radiograph." » More ...

WSU Veterinary Researcher Awarded Distinguished Professorship

Douglas R. Call, associate professor in WSU's Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology department, is the first recipient of the Caroline Engle Distinguished Professor in Research on Infectious Diseases. Dr. Call's distinguished professorship will span four years. "It's always an honor when colleagues recognize the value of our work," says Dr. Call, a molecular epidemiologist who specializes in antibiotic resistance research. "Our lab will use the awarded funds to conduct pilot studies and to support graduate education and recruitment." » More ...

A Generous Scholarship Changes the Course of a Student’s Career

Tracie Romsland always knew she wanted to work with animals.  Growing up in a family with more pets than people, Tracie cared for all kinds of animals from stray cats to dogs to horses.  After receiving her undergraduate degree in general science from Evergreen State College in Olympia, Wash., she began working in a veterinary clinic in Redmond, Wash., first as a receptionist and later as a technician.   “Right out of college, I wasn’t sure I was smart enough to be a veterinarian,” says Romsland.  “But I knew I wanted to work with animals.” » More ...

A New Ultrasound Machine Provides Pain Relief and Speeds Healing for Small Animals

Dogs and cats receiving physical therapy at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital will get some additional relief thanks to a new ultrasound machine from a generous friend of the college. The state-of-the-art ultrasound machine is the first for the small animal rehabilitation center, which began treating patients in January 2008. As of October the same year, the rehabilitation center treated more than 50 patients. » More ...

An Underwater Therapeutic Treadmill Helps a Dog Learn to Walk Again Thanks to Two Generous Friends of the College of Veterinary Medicine

After running for months with two broken legs, “Chocolate,” a stray Chesapeake Bay retriever, was brought to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital from a clinic in the Kennewick, Washington.  WSU veterinary orthopedic surgeon, Dr. Steve Martinez, performed several surgeries to help Chocolate regain the use of his injured front legs.  When the bandages came off, Chocolate began physical therapy in a special, underwater treadmill that allows animals to use their limbs without bearing full weight.  The treadmill, a gift to the college from two generous donors, makes it possible to begin the rehabilitation process earlier, which speeds recovery. » More ...