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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

Saving Patch

Patch on boat deck
In September 2010 when he was only 8 months old, “Patch,” a black and white Coton-de-Tulear, tangled with a car while his owners were visiting friends in Walla Walla, Washington. After a local veterinarian examined Patch and saw the extent of his injuries, she immediately referred Dan and Kathy Schwartz of Seattle, Washington, to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital. » More ...

Radiation Treatments Give A Golden Retriever Happy Years

In the summer of 2008, while fishing near Juneau, Alaska, Dave and Eddylee Scott found a lump on the top of their 7-year old Golden Retriever’s head. They made a quick call back home to their veterinarian, Dr. Lance Campbell (’99 DVM), who advised them to take "Cassie" to a clinic in Juneau and have the lump removed. The Southeast Alaska Animal Medical Center removed the tumor—a benign multilobular tumor of the bone—but within 3 weeks the tumor returned. » More ...

WSU’s School of Molecular Biosciences Joins the College of Veterinary Medicine

Standing in the lab looking at a document with students in lab coats behind them..
For the past seven years Dr. Mike Konkel, professor in the School for Molecular Biosciences, and Dr. Doug Call, professor in the Department of Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology, have been working together to find answers about how to better control some of the most serious disease causing bacteria found in our food supply. “I believe the best work comes from collaboration,” said Dr. Konkel. “The key for us is we complement each other well. We have overlapping interests, but different expertise and are willing to be flexible and accommodate each other. That’s what makes a collaboration like ours last for so many years.” » More ...

A Big Screen, High Definition Television Monitor Allows Trainees to Watch and Learn

Drs. Fransson and Watkins looking at a screen.
In a small, windowless room, four veterinarians simultaneously tie sutures, biopsy a liver, and perform minimally invasive abdominal surgery. No, this is not a typical operating room. It is a veterinary laparoscopic training laboratory—the first of its kind in the nation. But earlier this year before the WSU Veterinary Applied Laparoscopic Training, or VALT, laboratory got its new virtual laparoscopic trainer, the only place to watch the virtual procedures was on a small laptop computer monitor. » More ...

A Neurological Diagnostics Machine Helps to Detect Disease and Deafness

Dr. Chen using the electrodiagnostics machine on a dog patient
The WSU neurology service's new Electrodiagnostics machine will help make advanced muscle and nerve disorder diagnoses thanks to a generous friend of the college. Electromyography (EMG) and nerve conduction velocity (NCV) are two of the medical tests veterinarians will be able to perform with the new equipment. » More ...

A Large Screen TV Monitor Makes Teaching and Learning Easier

Students looking at the monitor.
Students can now watch ultrasounds, radiographs (or x-rays), and other procedures more easily thanks to a new large screen TV monitor from a generous friend of the college. Before the WSU cardiology group received the monitor, veterinary students crowded around a small computer screen or viewing window. Now students can view procedures more easily and more students can watch procedures at the same time. Students will also be able to watch medical procedures, such as fluoroscopy, in real time. » More ...

A New Portable Echocardiograph Makes Heart Diagnosis Possible in Remote Locations

Patients at WSU's Veterinary Teaching Hospital can now receive on-location cardiovascular diagnosis thanks to a new portable echocardiograph from a generous friend of the college. "We are very grateful to have this machine." said Dr. Lynne Nelson, a WSU veterinary cardiologist. "This echo is the latest, state-of-the-art, portable machine. Because it is portable, we can take it to a sick horse, kitten, or any animal." » More ...

A New Gamma Camera Makes Lameness Diagnoses Easier Thanks to a Generous Gift to the College of Veterinary Medicine

The exact cause of lameness in horses can sometimes be difficult to find. But thanks to a generous donor, the WSU College of Veterinary Medicine's new gamma camera will make diagnosis easier. "The gamma camera is essential for equine orthopedic lameness," says Dr. Kelly Farnsworth assistant professor in WSU's Veterinary Clinical Sciences department. "Localized lameness is difficult to radiograph." » More ...

WSU Veterinary Researcher Awarded Distinguished Professorship

Douglas R. Call, associate professor in WSU's Veterinary Microbiology and Pathology department, is the first recipient of the Caroline Engle Distinguished Professor in Research on Infectious Diseases. Dr. Call's distinguished professorship will span four years. "It's always an honor when colleagues recognize the value of our work," says Dr. Call, a molecular epidemiologist who specializes in antibiotic resistance research. "Our lab will use the awarded funds to conduct pilot studies and to support graduate education and recruitment." » More ...