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College of Veterinary Medicine Advance Newsletter

An Adopted Tabby’s New Lease on Life

Chester lying on a WSU cougar pillow
Roya Eshragh and Gyan Harwood of Vancouver, British Columbia, wanted a cat. So they did what many animal lovers do; they went to their local shelter to adopt an older animal in need of a home. They fell in love with an orange tabby and named him “Chester” (he had previously been called “Cheetoh,” but they thought he looked more like a “Chester”). On January 30, 2012—Chester’s adoption day—his life changed forever. » More ...

A Dog May One Day Walk Again Thanks to the Good Samaritan Fund

Juno at a campground
On a Sunday morning in October 2012, Tara Johnson and her husband heard their dog "Juno," a 4-year-old Husky, whimpering several yards from their house. They ran to find her lying on the ground not moving. Although they couldn't see any bite marks through her fur, they did see saliva on her neck. "That would be typical of a wolf attack," said Johnson. "We'd had several wolf sightings near our house a few months before she was injured." » More ...

Giving Back Just a Little Makes a Big Difference

As a non-traditional student with a wife and three kids to support, Billy Hansen ('14 DVM) has a lot on his plate. Because of the skyrocketing costs of a veterinary education, Billy, like so many of his classmates, relies almost entirely on student loans to pay for school. So when he received the $750 Dr. Aaron and Laura Gibbons Family Giving Back Scholarship it meant a lot. "It was a small amount compared to my student loans, but it made the burden of the semester lighter," said Hansen. "I didn't have to worry so much about finances and that helped me concentrate on school and my studies." » More ...

Donor Gifts Help Purchase a Needed Ophthalmology Table

Dr. Allession giving an eye exam to the dog on the table.
Small gifts can add up to make a big difference. In 2009, Dr. Terri Alessio, WSU veterinary ophthalmology specialist, received a new height-adjustable examination table that has helped hundreds of her patients that she can now easily bring to eye level. "It really helps for patient comfort," said Dr. Alessio. "We can adjust the table to where the animal feels most comfortable." » More ...

A Gift to Last

Katherine Rempe in a laboratory
Every year for 6 years, Pat Youngman ('43 BS in Bacteriology and Public Health) did something that has helped hundreds of WSU students. She provided enough support for the now School of Molecular Biosciences to purchase one Leica microscope each year. "The microscopes made all the things we read in text books or hear in lecture become real," said Katherine Rempe ('10 Microbiology), who is currently a Ph.D student in molecular genetics and microbiology at Duke University. "We could see how bacteria move and behave differently." » More ...

After Cancer Treatement Therapy Dog Has Two More Wonderful Years

"Mia," a bassador (Basset/Labrador mix) and therapy dog, was diagnosed with lymphoma in February 2012, just five months before her 10th birthday. She received several rounds of chemotherapy at the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital and is currently in remission. In July, Mia with her canine family members celebrated her birthday by feasting on meat and cream cheese cupcakes. » More ...

WSU’s Veterinary Patient Wellness Service

Black lab with yellow vest in the treadmill with Lori Lutskas
Who says cookies can’t be good for you? When Lori Lutskas goes to work each day, she carries a bag of cookies with her to encourage her patients to do their exercises. “We do cookie stretches,” said Lutskas, a licensed veterinary technician and WSU’s veterinary physical rehabilitation practitioner. She puts a cookie (aka a healthy dog treat) on a dog’s hip so the dog will stretch around to get it. “We try to make it fun.” » More ...

Bald Eagle Released After Treatment for Lead Poisoning

Bald eagle coming out of the box
A five-year-old bald eagle was brought to the WSU Veterinary Teaching Hospital in January after he was found in a ditch near Orofino, Idaho. After determining that the eagle showed signs of severe lead poisoning, Dr. Nickol Finch, head of the exotic and wildlife unit, gave him intravenous fluids and chelation therapy, which binds the lead so it can be eliminated through the kidneys. » More ...